Snackbar Implementation in PSLab Android App

In PSLab android app we have developed the functionality of logging sensor data in CSV format. We can start and stop the data recording using the save button in the upper right corner of the menu bar and toast message was shown to notify the user for logging status whether it is started or stopped but it leads to some problem like:-

  • The user doesn’t know where the logged file has been created in the external storage.
  • If the user accidentally clicked on the save button the data logging will start the user have to manually go the storage location and delete the recently created unwanted CSV file.

What’s the solution?

The solution to both these problem is solved by implementing Snackbar instead of Toast message.

According to Material Design documentation:-

The Snackbar widget provides brief feedback about an operation through a message at the bottom of the screen. Snackbar disappears automatically, either after a timeout or after a user interaction elsewhere on the screen, and can also be swiped off the screen.

Snackbar can also offer the ability to perform an action, such as undoing an action that was just taken or retrying an action that had failed.

 

Figure 1 shows a Snackbar sample
(Source: – https://material.io/develop/android/components/snackbar/ )

 

To implement the Snackbar in our Android app I started by creating a custom snack bar class which contains all the code to create and show the Snackbar on the screen.

public class CustomSnackBar {

   public static void showSnackBar(@NonNull CoordinatorLayout holderLayout,  
                                   @NonNull String displayText,
                                   String actionText, 
                                   View.OnClickListener clickListener){
       
   Snackbar snackbar =     
              Snackbar.make(holderLayout,displayText,Snackbar.LENGTH_LONG)
              .setAction(actionText, clickListener);

  //do your customization here
}

The custom class contains a static method ‘showSnackBar()’ having parameters:

Parameter Return Type Description
holderLayout CoordinatorLayout Container layout in which the snack bar will be shown at the bottom (should not be null)
displayText String Text to be displayed in the content of Snackbar (should not be null)
actionText String Clickable text which has some action associated with it
clickListener View.OnClickListener On click listener specifying an action to be performed when actionText is clicked

 

Inside the method, I called the static make()  method provided by the Snackbar class and passed holderlayout, displayText and duration of Snackbar in this case Snackbar.LENGTH_LONG as parameters.

Then I called setAction() and passed in the actionText and the clickListener as parameters in it to set the action text. If we pass in null no action text will be generated.

Then, if we want to changes the action text color we can do that by calling setActionTextColor() and passing in the desired color.

snackbar.setActionTextColor(ContextCompat.getColor(holderLayout.getContext(), R.color.colorPrimary));

And if we want to change the content text color then we need to first get the view then we need to get the instance of TextView containing the content text using findViewById() and passing android.support.design.R.id.snackbar_text which is default ID for context TextView, and then call setTextColor() to set the desired color.

View sbView = snackbar.getView();
   TextView textView =     
             sbView.findViewById(android.support.design.R.id.snackbar_text);
       textView.setTextColor(Color.WHITE);
   }

So, now our Snackbar engine is complete now we need to call CustomSnackBar class static method showSnackbar() in our sensor data logger.

For doing this I replaced all the instances of the Toast message with the ‘CustomSnackBar’ by passing in the desired messages that were being passed in Toast message.

But I still need to find the location of our stored CSV file and a method to delete the current generated CSV file.

For that, I did below modification to the CSVLogger class in PSLab android app.

public class CSVLogger {
   private static final String CSV_DIRECTORY = "PSLab";
   public CSVLogger(String category) {
       this.category = category;
       setupPath();
   }
   /*Below methods are included at the bottom of the class */
   public String getCurrentFilePath() {
       return Environment.getExternalStorageDirectory().getAbsolutePath() +
               File.separator + CSV_DIRECTORY + File.separator + category;
   }
   public void deleteFile() {
       csvFile.delete();
   }
}

Now for passing the location of the stored file and implementing delete option, I called the below method when the CSV logging is stopped by the user:

CustomSnackBar.showSnackBar((CoordinatorLayout) parent.findViewById(R.id.cl),

                    “CSV File stored at” + " " +lux_logger.getCurrentFilePath(),
  
                    “DELETE”,

                    new View.OnClickListener() {
                              Override
                              public void onClick(View view) {
                                             lux_logger.deleteFile();    
                              });

By doing this I get a Snackbar as shown in Figure 2, clicking on the “DELETE” text deletes the current CSV file.

Figure 2 shows snackbar showing file stored location and delete option

 

So, implementing Snackbar helped to make the app interactive and keeps user notified and control the data logging.

Resources

  1. https://www.journaldev.com/10324/android-snackbar-example-tutorial – Android SnackBar example implemetation tutorial
  2. https://material.io/develop/android/components/snackbar/ – Android Material Desing implementation of Snackbar.

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I2C communication in PSLab Android

PSLab device is a compact electronic device with a variety of features. One of them is the ability to integrate sensors and get readings from them. One might think that why they should use PSLab device to get sensor readings and they can use some other hardware like Arduino. In those devices, user has to create firmware and need to know how to interface them with correct sampling rates and settings. But with PSLab, they all come in the whole package. User just have to plug the device to his phone and the sensor to device and he’s ready.

The idea of this blog post is to show how this sophisticated process is actually happening. Before that, let me give you a basic introduction on how I2C communication protocol works. I2C protocol is superior to UART and SPI protocols as they are device limited or requires many wires. But with I2C, you can literally connect thousands of sensors with just 4 wires. These wires are labeled as follows;

  • VCC – Power line
  • GND – Ground line
  • SDA – Data line
  • SCL – Signal clock

It is required that the SDA and SCL lines need to be connected to VCC line using two pull up resistors. But that’s just hardware. Let’s move on to learn how I2C communicate.

Here there is this communicating concept called master and slave. To start communication, master issues a global signal like a broadcast to all the devices connected to SCL and SDA lines. This signal contains the address of the slave, master needs to address and get data from. If the slave received this call to him, he will pull down the SDA line to signal the master that he heard him and ready to communicate with him. Here communication means reading or writing data. Then the communication happens and the link between master and slave breaks giving opportunity to other masters and slaves.

One might think this is a slow process. But these signals are transmitted at high frequencies. In PSLab it is at 100 kHz and that is one millisecond.

PSLab library has a special class to handle I2C communication. That is

public class I2C {/**/}

 

Once this class is initiated, one has to call the start function to start communication. This method requires the address we wish to communicate with and the mode of operation stating if it is a read or write operation

public int start(int address, int rw) throws IOException {
   packetHandler.sendByte(commandsProto.I2C_HEADER);
   packetHandler.sendByte(commandsProto.I2C_START);
   packetHandler.sendByte((address << 1) | rw & 0xff);
   return (packetHandler.getAcknowledgement() >> 4);
}

 

Once the address is sent out, protocol requires us to stop and wait for acknowledgement.

public void wait() throws IOException {
   packetHandler.sendByte(commandsProto.I2C_HEADER);
   packetHandler.sendByte(commandsProto.I2C_WAIT);
   packetHandler.getAcknowledgement();
}

 

If there are no congestion in the lines such as reading from multiple devices, the acknowledgement will be instantaneous. Once that is complete, we can start communication either byte-wise or bulk-wise

public int send(int data) throws IOException {
   packetHandler.sendByte(commandsProto.I2C_HEADER);
   packetHandler.sendByte(commandsProto.I2C_SEND);
   packetHandler.sendByte(data);
   return (packetHandler.getAcknowledgement() >> 4);
}

 

As an example, reading sensor values at a given interval can be done using the following method call.

public ArrayList<Byte> read(int length) throws IOException {
   ArrayList<Byte> data = new ArrayList<>();
   for (int i = 0; i < length - 1; i++) {
       packetHandler.sendByte(commandsProto.I2C_HEADER);
       packetHandler.sendByte(commandsProto.I2C_READ_MORE);
       data.add(packetHandler.getByte());
       packetHandler.getAcknowledgement();
   }
   packetHandler.sendByte(commandsProto.I2C_HEADER);
   packetHandler.sendByte(commandsProto.I2C_READ_END);
   data.add(packetHandler.getByte());
   packetHandler.getAcknowledgement();
   return data;
}

 

Once we get the data bundle, either we can save them or display in a graph whatever the way it’s convenient.

Reference:

  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I%C2%B2C

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Adding Data Point Markers to OSM

PSLab Android app supports multiple sensors external and internal. Users can view sensor readings and record them into a csv file for later use. They can also have their location embedded into the data set they are recording. Saving the location related to each sensor reading is important. Say in a school experiment teacher can ask the student to measure dust particle concentration in city and inside his house. If the data set didn’t have any reference to the location where it was recorded, it is just incomplete. To facilitate this feature, we have enabled location in data recordings.

Enabling location is just not enough. User should be able to view the locations. Probably on a map itself would be a good idea. With the use of Open Street Maps, we can add markers to specific locations. These markers can be used as a point to show on map where a specific data set had been recorded by the user. This can be implemented further to add additional features such as standardized labels to view which data set is at which location etc.

Figure 1: Markers on Map

Unlike Google Maps API, in Open Street Maps there is no direct implementation to add a marker. But it is not a hard implementation either. We can simply create a class extending map overlays and use that as a base to add markers.

We can start by creating a new class that extends ItemizedOverlay<OverlayItem> class as follows. In this class, it would be wise to have an array list full of markers we are using in the map to modularize the whole markers related tasks into this one class rather than implementing in every place where map is used.

public class MapOverlay extends ItemizedOverlay<OverlayItem> {

    private ArrayList<OverlayItem> overlayItemList = new   ArrayList<OverlayItem>();

}

 

Once the class is initiated, have the following methods implemented. The following method will add markers to the array list we have created at the beginning.

public void addItem(GeoPoint p, String title, String snippet){
  OverlayItem newItem = new OverlayItem(title, snippet, p);
  overlayItemList.add(newItem);
  populate(); 
}

 

This method will be used to handle focusing events related to map markers.

@Override
public boolean onSnapToItem(int arg0, int arg1, Point arg2, IMapView arg3){
  return false;
}

 

Following method is used by the map itself to generate markers from the marker list.

@Override
protected OverlayItem createItem(int arg0) {
  return overlayItemList.get(arg0);
}

 

This method is an overriden method we will have to include in the class body.

@Override
public int size() {
  return overlayItemList.size();
}

 

Once the overlay class is completed, we can move on to actual implementation of a map on Openstreetmap view.

From the main activity where the map is viewed, initiate the marker overlay class and pass the drawable that needs to be shown as the marker to the class constructor as follows:

MapOverlay mapoverlay = null;
Drawable marker=getResources().getDrawable(android.R.drawable.map_hand);
int markerWidth = marker.getIntrinsicWidth();
int markerHeight = marker.getIntrinsicHeight();
marker.setBounds(0, markerHeight, markerWidth, 0);

ResourceProxy resourceProxy = new DefaultResourceProxyImpl(getApplicationContext());
mapoverlay = new MapOverlay(marker, resourceProxy);
mapView.getOverlays().add(mapoverlay);
         
GeoPoint point = new GeoPoint(55.75, 37.616667);
mapoverlay.addItem(point, "Russia", "Russia");

 

We can add as many GeoPoints as we want to markers list and they all will be displayed on the map like this;

Figure 2: Final Output of Markers

Reference:

http://android-coding.blogspot.com/2012/06/example-of-implementing-openstreetmap.html

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Capturing Position Data with PSLab Android App

PSLab Android app by FOSSASIA can be used to visualize different waveforms, signal levels and patterns. Many of them involve logging data from different instruments. These data sets can be unique and the user might want them to be specific to a location or a time. To facilitate this feature, PSLab Android app offers a feature to save user’s current location along with the data points.

This implementation can be done in two ways. One is to use Google Maps APIs and the other one is to use LocationManager classes provided by Android itself. The first one is more on to proprietary libraries and it will give errors when used in an open source publishing platform like Fdroid as they require all the libraries used in an app to be open. So we have to go with the latter, using LocationManager classes.

As first step, we will have to request permission from the user to allow the app access his current location. This can be easily done by adding a permission tag in the Manifest.xml file.

<uses-permission android:name="android.permission.ACCESS_FINE_LOCATION" />

 

Since we are not using Google Maps APIs, capturing the current location will take a little while and that can be considered as the only downfall of using this method. We have to constantly check for a location change to capture the data related to current location. This can be easily done by attaching a LocationListener as it will do the very thing for us.

private LocationListener locationListener = new LocationListener() {
   @Override
   public void onLocationChanged(Location location) {
       locationAvailable = true;
   }

   @Override
   public void onStatusChanged(String s, int i, Bundle bundle) {/**/}

   @Override
   public void onProviderEnabled(String s) {/**/}

   @Override
   public void onProviderDisabled(String s) {
       // TODO: Handle GPS turned on/off situations
   }
};

 

In case if the user has turned off GPS in his device, this method wouldn’t work. We will have to request him to turn the feature on using a simple dialog box or a bottom sheet dialog.

We can also customize how frequent the locationlistener should check for a location using another class named LocationManager. This class can be instantiated as follows:

locationManager = (LocationManager) getSystemService(Context.LOCATION_SERVICE);

 

Then we can easily set the time interval using requestLocationUpdates method. Here I have requested location updates in every one second. That is a quite reasonable rate.

locationManager.requestLocationUpdates(provider, 1000, 1, locationListener);

 

Once we have set all this up, we can capture the current location assuming that the user has turned on the GPS option from his device settings and the LocationManager class has a new location as we checked earlier.

if (locationAvailable) {
   Location location = locationManager.getLastKnownLocation(LocationManager.GPS_PROVIDER);
}

 

Each location will contain details related to its position such as latitudes and longitudes. We can log these data using the CSVLogger class implementation in PSLab Android app and let user have this option while doing his experiments.

Reference:

  1. An open source implementation : https://github.com/borneq/HereGPSLocation/blob/master/app/src/main/java/com/borneq/heregpslocation/MainActivity.java

Google Maps: https://developers.google.com/maps/documentation/android-sdk/intro

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Setting up environment to build PSLab Android app using Fdroid Build

Fdroid is a place for open source enthusiasts and developers to host their Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) for free and get more people onboard into their community. In order to host an app in their repository, one has to go through a several steps of builds and tests. This is to ensure that the software provided by them are as quality and safe as they can ever be. They are not allowing proprietary libraries or tools to integrate into any app or they will  be published outside the Fdroid main repository (fdroid-data) so that the users will know what they are downloading.

In a normal Linux computer where we are developing Android apps and have setup Android Studio will not be able to run the build command using:

$ fdroid build -v -l org.fossasia.pslab

The reason behind this is that we have not installed gradle and build tools required by the “fdroid build” because they are not useful in our day today activities for standalone activities. First thing we need to do is, install gradle separately. This will include adding gradle to $PATH as well.

Download the latest gradle version zip file or the version your project is using with the following command. In PSLab Android app, we are using 4.5.1 version and the snippet below include that version.

$ wget https://services.gradle.org/distributions/gradle-4.5.1-bin.zip

Next step is to install this in a local folder. We can select any path we want, but /opt/ folder is generally used in such scenarios.

sudo mkdir /opt/gradle
sudo unzip -d /opt/gradle gradle-4.5.1-bin.zip

Then we can add gradle to our $PATH variable using the following command:

$ export PATH=$PATH:/opt/gradle/gradle-4.5.1/bin

Now we are all set with gradle settings. Next step is to verify that the fdroid server is properly configured and up to date. When you run the build command after setting up the gradle in PC, it will throw an error similar to “failed to find any output apks”. This causes if the installed fdroid server version is old.

Fdroid server is running on python 3 and it will require some additional libraries pre-installed to properly function.

$ sudo apt-get install vagrant virtualbox git python3-certifi python3-libvirt python3-requestbuilder python3-yaml python3-clint python3-vagrant python3-paramiko python3-pyasn1 python3-pyasn1-modules

Once these libraries are installed, remove the previous instance of fdroidserver by using the following command:

$ sudo apt-get remove fdroidserver

Then we can reinstall the latest version of fdroid server from git using the following command:

$ git clone https://gitlab.com/fdroid/fdroidserver.git
export PATH="$PATH:$PWD/fdroidserver"

Now we are all set to do a brand new lint build on our PC to make our app ready to be published in Fdroid repository!

Reference:

  1. Install gradle : https://www.vultr.com/docs/how-to-install-gradle-on-ubuntu-16-10
  2. Gradle versions : https://gradle.org/releases
  3. Setting up Fdroid-server : https://f-droid.org/en/docs/Build_Server_Setup/

Installing fdroidserver : https://gitlab.com/fdroid/fdroiddata/blob/master/README.md#quickstart

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Implementing Multimeter in PSLab Android App

The Pocket Science Lab Android app being on the verge of development have various new features adding up per day. One of the new things added up recently is the splitting of the control section in three different instruments and implementing the control read section into a multimeter. This blog will be discussing about how the multimeter is implemented.

The different instruments are power section, multimeter and wave generator. While in the previous implementation of control section it was divided into three parts namely control main, control read and control advanced as shown in figure (1). The control is the power source, read is the multimeter and advanced section is the wave generator.

Figure  (1): Screenshot of control section

Figure (1) shows the previous implementation of a multimeter i.e the read section but as we know this is way different than the actual implementation of a multimeter and thus from here comes the task of implementing a new multimeter.

What is a Multimeter, how does it looks?

A multimeter basically is an instrument designed to measure electric current, voltage, and usually resistance, typically over several ranges of value.

          Figure (2): Showing a real multimeter instrument and its different sections [2]

Figure(2) clearly shows how an actual multimeter looks. It basically has three important components i.e the display the buttons and the rotary knob or the dial and thus the task was to implement the same in PSLab android.

Implementation in PSLab

Figure (3) :  Screenshot of new implementation of multimeter

The implementation of multimeter is thus inspired from its original look i.e it has got basic buttons, a rotary knob and a display. Figure (3) shows the implementation of multimeter in the android-app

Back-end of Multimeter

A separate multimeter activity was implemented for the multimeter. The main back-end part of getting the resistance, capacitance, frequency and count pulse were taken from the communication related classes such as the ScienceLab class and PacketHandler class. For example to get the voltage calculation we use the getRawableVoltage function

private double getRawAverageVoltage(String channelName) {
  try {
      int chosa = this.calcCHOSA(channelName);
      mPacketHandler.sendByte(mCommandsProto.ADC);
      mPacketHandler.sendByte(mCommandsProto.GET_VOLTAGE_SUMMED);
      mPacketHandler.sendByte(chosa);
      int vSum = mPacketHandler.getVoltageSummation();
      mPacketHandler.getAcknowledgement();
      return vSum / 16.0;
  } catch (IOException | NullPointerException e) {
      e.printStackTrace();
      Log.e(TAG, "Error in getRawAverageVoltage");
  }
  return 0;
}

The above function shows the pure backend of PSLab and how data is taken from the hardware using the packet handler class, after which the data is processed in various other functions after we getting the final result. Similarly the function to get count pulse is

public int readPulseCount() {
 try {
  mPacketHandler.sendByte(mCommandsProto.COMMON);
  mPacketHandler.sendByte(mCommandsProto.FETCH_COUNT);
  int count = mPacketHandler.getVoltageSummation();
  mPacketHandler.getAcknowledgement();
  return 10 * count;
 } catch (IOException e) {
  e.printStackTrace();
 }
 return -1;
}

As we see that the data is being taken through a similar manner in the above function i.e using the packetHandler class(by sending and receiving bytes). Thus in all the other functions for capacitance, frequency similar communication model can be found.

Similarly all the functions are implemented in the ScienceLab class and thus all the functions are directly called from the ScienceLab class in the Multimeter activity. For more knowledge on these one can directly have a look at the PSLab android app codes available in Github.

Implementation of the Rotary Knob

The rotary knob is implemented using the BeppiMenozzi Knob library. More information regarding the same can be found in my previous blog on implementing the rotary knob.

Resources:

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Implementing Settings for Lux Meter Instrument in PSLab Android App

In PSLab android app, we have included sensor instruments which use either inbuilt sensor of smartphone or external sensor to record sensor data. For example, Lux Meter uses the light sensor to record lux data but the problem is that these instruments doesn’t contain settings option to configure the sensor record-setting like which sensor to use, change the update period etc.

Therefore, we need to create a settings page for the Lux Meter instrument which allows the user to modify the properties of the sensor instrument. For that I will use Android Preference APIs to build a settings interface that is similar to setting activity in any other android app.

The main building block of the settings activity is the Preference object. Each preference appears as a single setting item in an activity and it corresponds to key-value pair which stores the settings in default Shared Preferences file. Every time any setting is changed by the user the Android will store the updated value of the setting in the default shared preferences which we can read in any other activity across the app.

In the following steps I will describe instruction on how to create the setting interface in Android app: 

Step1 Include the dependency

First, we need to include the dependency for v7 Preference Support Library by including the following code:

dependencies { 
compile fileTree(dir: 'libs', include: ['*.jar']) 
compile 'com.android.support:appcompat-v7:23.1.1' 
compile 'com.android.support:design:23.1.1' 
compile 'com.android.support:preference-v7:23.1.1' 
}

 Step 2 Creating the preferences screen in XML

For this step, I have created a preference screen which will be inflated when the settings fragment is being created.

I created a file named  “lux_meter_settings.xml” and place it in the res/xml/ directory.

The root node for the XML file must be a <PreferenceScreen> element. We have to add each Preference within this element. Each child I added within the <PreferenceScreen> element appears as a single item in the list of settings.

The preference which I have used are:

<EdittextPreference> This preference opens up a dialog box with edit text and stores whatever value is written by the user in the edit text. I have used this preference for inputting update period and high limit of data during recording.

<CheckboxPreference> shows an item with a checkbox for a setting that is either enabled or disabled. The saved value is a boolean (true if it’s checked). I have used this preference for enabling or disabling location data with the recorded data.

<ListPreference> opens a dialog with a list of radio buttons. The saved value can be any one of the supported value types. I have used this preference to allow the user to choose between multiple sensor types.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<PreferenceScreen xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android">
       <EditTextPreference
           android:key="setting_lux_update_period"
           android:title="@string/update_period"
           android:dialogTitle="@string/update_period"
           android:defaultValue="1000"
           android:dialogMessage="Please provide time interval(in ms) at which data will be updated"
           android:summary="Update period is 900ms"/>

       <EditTextPreference
           android:key="setting_lux_high_limit"
           android:title="High Limit"
           android:dialogTitle="High Limit"
           android:defaultValue="2000"
           android:dialogMessage="Please provide maximum limit of LUX value to be recorded"
           android:summary="High Limit is 2000 Lux"/>

       <CheckBoxPreference
           android:defaultValue="false"
           android:key="include_location_sensor_data"
           android:summary="Include the location data in the logged file"
           android:title="Include Location Data" />
</PreferenceScreen>

The above XML file will produce a layout as shown in Figure 1 below:

Figure 1 shows a preview of settings layout in Android Studio

 

Step 3 Implementing the backend of setting interface

As android Documentation clearly states:

As your app’s settings UI is built using Preference objects instead of View objects, you need to use a specialized Activity or Fragment subclass to display the list settings:

  • If your app supports versions of Android older than 3.0 (API level 10 and lower), you must build the activity as an extension of the PreferenceActivity class.
  • On Android 3.0 and later, you should instead use a traditional Activity that hosts a PreferenceFragment that displays your app settings.

Therefore, I first created an Activity named “SettingsActivity” which will act as a host for a Fragment. This gist contains code for SettingsActivity which I defined in the PSLab android app which will show the Setting Fragment.

Now, for setting fragment I have created a new fragment and name it “LuxMeterSettingsFragment” and make that fragment class extends the PreferenceFragmentCompat class and for which I needed to add this import statement.

import android.support.v7.preference.PreferenceFragmentCompat;

And then inside the SettingsFragment, I overridden the following method like this:

@Override
public void onCreatePreferences(Bundle savedInstanceState,
                                String rootKey) {
    setPreferencesFromResource(R.xml.lux_meter_settings, rootKey);
}

This method is called when the Android is creating the Preferences that is when we need to call the method ‘setPreferencesFromResource()’ and pass the resource file in which we have defined our preferences along with the root key which comes as a parameter. Here, the Android will create preferences referred by the key which we have provided and initialize it to the default value in the default SharedPreferences file.

Step 4 Providing setting option to navigate to setting activity

First I included a setting option in the menu file which is getting inflated in the Lux Meter Activity toolbar as shown in below code.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<menu xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
   xmlns:app="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res-auto">
  
   ...

   <item
       android:id="@+id/settings"
       android:title="@string/lux_meter_settings"
       app:showAsAction="never" />
</menu>

Then, heading over to  Lux Meter Activity in the onOptionItemSelected() method I added below code in which I created intent to open Setting Activity when the setting option is selected.

@Override
public boolean onOptionsItemSelected(MenuItem item) {
case R.id.settings:
   Intent settingIntent = new Intent(this, SettingsActivity.class);
   settingIntent.putExtra("title", "Lux Meter Settings");
   startActivity(settingIntent);
   break;
}

After this step, we can see the settings option in Lux Meter Activity as shown in Figure 2

Figure 2 shows the setting option in the overflow menu

 

To see if its working opens the app -> open Lux Meter Instrument-> Open Overflow Menu -> click on Lux Meter Setting Option to open settings.

Here we can the Lux Meter Setting as shown by the Figure 3.

Figure 3 shows the screenshot of the Lux Meter Setting activity on the actual device

 

Step 5 Implementing listener for change in Preferences item

Now we can also implement a listener by making SettingsFragment class implement SharedPreference.OnSharedPreferenceChangeListener interface and then overriding the onSharedPreferenceChanged() method.

Now, to register this listener with the Preference Screen which we will do it in the onResume() method of the fragment and deregister the listener in the onPause() method to correspond with the lifecycle of the fragment.

@Override
public void onResume() {
   super.onResume();
      
getPreferenceScreen().getSharedPreferences().registerOnSharedPreferenceChangeListener(this);
}
@Override
public void onPause() {
   super.onPause();
        getPreferenceScreen().getSharedPreferences().unregisterOnSharedPreferenceChangeListener(this);
}

Thus we have successfully implemented settings for the Lux Meter Instrument.

Resources

  1. Adding Settings to an App – Google Developer Fundamental Course Article on how to add settings.
  2. Gist – Setting Activity implementation – The gist used for setting activity in the app
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Implementing Rotary Knob in PSLab Android App

PSLab android application as we all know has got various instrument such as oscilloscope, logic analyzer, wave generator, etc.. . Although many of  these instrument require redesigning of it’s UI. One such instrument is the  Multimeter. The Multimeter UI required the implementation of the rotary knob as it is also present in an actual Multimeter.Thus this blog is solely on how to implement a Rotary Knob in an Android App.

Figure 1: Showing a basic knob

What is Rotary Knob ?

A Rotary knob is  a customizable selector that replicates the behaviour of a knob with discrete values.The knob is a powerful tool it has a lot of advantages over other radio-buttons, seek bars or other selectors.[1][2]

      • It has an immediate graphical indication of the current value, the number of choices and where the value is in the overall range.
      • Works fine also with few choices, as a multi-state toggle.
      • Swipe gestures allow to change values very quickly, using the entire screen for the gesture, but only a tiny zone of it for the graphics.

Implementation of Rotary Knob in your app[1]

In this blog the rotary knob is implemented using the BeppiMenozzi Knob library[1] as by doing this we don’t have to manually create the extra class for the knob and we don’t have to write the code from scratch.

This blog will give you step by step guide on how to implement this on your app.

        1. In your project level build.gradle file add the following lines of code.
          allprojects {
            repositories {
                   ….
                maven { url "https://jitpack.io" }
                ….
            }
          }
        2. In you app level build.gradle file add the following lines of codes in your dependencies.
          compile 'com.github.BeppiMenozzi:Knob:1.9.
        3. Minimal code :-
          This contains the minimum number of lines of code for knob

          xmlns:app="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res-auto"
          ...
          <it.beppi.knoblibrary.Knob
                  android:layout_width="64dp"
                  android:layout_height="64dp"
                  android:id="@+id/knob"
                  app:kNumberOfStates="6"
           />

          Java listener-

          xmlns:app="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res-auto"
          Knob knob = (Knob) findViewById(R.id.knob);
          knob.setState(firstState);
          knob.setOnStateChanged(new Knob.OnStateChanged() {
                  @Override
                  public void onState(int state) {
                  // do something
                  }
              });

          This java method gives the user the position of the tip of theknob.
          Also there are various other advantages of using this library.

              • The Knob is completely customizable. The many customizable attributes can all be set both via xml file, and programmatically.
              • This  page gives the list of all the methods for customizing a knob.

           

        4.  Implementing a simple knob app
          tv= (TextView)findViewById(R.id.tv);
          Knob knob = (Knob) findViewById(R.id.knob);
          knob.setState(0);
          knob.setOnStateChanged(new Knob.OnStateChanged() {
             @Override
             public void onState(int state) {
                 // do something
                 tv.setText(String.valueOf(state));
             }
          });

Now let us see the implementation of this simple app

Figure 2: showing basic knob implementation in android

So this is how we can implement a rotary knob in any Android Application.

Resources:

 

 

 

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Producing Waveforms using Wave Generator module in the PSLab Android App

This blog will demonstrate how to produce different waveforms using the Wave Generator module in the PSLab android app and view them on the Oscilloscope.

The Wave Generator in PSLab android app is simple to use and has a UI which is similar to physical commodity wave generators. It is capable of producing different waveforms like sine, sawtooth and square wave.

Apparatus Required

Before getting started with the wave generator we require the following items:

  1. PSLab device
  2. An android phone with PSLab app installed in it.
  3. USB cable (Mini B)
  4. OTG(On the Go) wire
  5. Some connecting wires having pins at both ends

Understanding the Wave Generator Pins

Figure 1 shows the pin diagram of the PSLab device

Let me briefly explain the use of the pins that are going to be used in the Wave generator module:

S1 and S2 pins

The PSLab device contains two pins (S1, S2) which are capable of producing two independent analog waveforms (sine,  sawtooth) having different frequencies and phase offset. The frequency range is from 10Hz to 5Khz.

SQR1, SQR2, SQR3 and SQR4 pin

The SQR1 pin is used for producing the square waveform and all the SQ pins can be used together to produce four different PWM signal having the same frequency. These PWM signal can have a different duty cycle and phase.

CH1, CH2 and CH3 pin

The CH pins are used by the oscilloscope in the  PSLab android app to monitor waveform signals produced by the wave generator pins. They can be used together to simultaneously monitor multiple waveforms.

Setting up the Device

We need to connect the PSLab device with the mobile phone as shown in Figure 2 which can be done by following steps:

  1. Connect a micro USB(Mini B) to the PSLab device.
  2. Connect the other end of the micro USB cable to the OTG.
  3. Connect the OTG to the phone.
Figure 2 shows the connection of the PSLab device with the smartphone

Producing Waveforms

Now, once the device has been properly connected to the device (which is shown at the top right corner of the app), then in the instruments page scroll down to the Wave Generator card and click on it to open the WaveGenerator activity.

Figure 3 shows the instruments containing card view to all the instruments and icon to show device status

Here you will see a screen like shown in Figure 4 containing two monitors and a controlling panel with lots of buttons. Here the Waveform panel is used to control the S1 and S2 pins whose properties are shown on the left monitor screen and the Digital panel is used to control the SQR pins whose properties are shown on the right monitor screen.

Figure 4 shows the UI of the Wave Generator Activity

For sine/sawtooth wave:

Connect the S1 pin to the CH1 pin using a connecting wire, then in the Waveform panel select the Wave1 button, choose the type of waveform(either sine or sawtooth), then click on the Freq button to change the frequency of the wave, then use the Seek bar or the up/down arrow buttons to change the value of frequency and then press the set button to set the frequency for the S1 pin as shown below:

Figure 5 The GIF shows the setting of the properties of the W1 pin in the UI

Now, click the view button at bottom right corner, this will directly open the Oscilloscope provided by the PSLab android app .

Once the oscilloscope is open, check the CH1 pin from the panel in the bottom and we can see the sine wave in the monitor shown by the screen in Figure 6 and Figure 7

Figure 6 shows the screenshot of oscilloscope showing the sine wave
Figure 7 shows the screenshot of the oscilloscope showing sawtooth wave

Similarly, if you want to see two sine waves connect the S1 pin to the CH1 and connect the S2 pin to the CH2 channel , choose the wave-type for both pin, set the frequencies for both of the waves, here you can also set the phase difference between the two waves, for setting phase difference first click on Wave2 button it will enable the phase button, then click on the Phase button and set the value of phase with the help of the Seek bar.

For Square Wave

Connect the CH1 pin to the SQ1 pin, after making the connection head over to the Digital panel in the Wave Generator, ensure that the mode is selected to square, now click on the Freq button in the digital panel and set the frequency of the square wave with the help of Seek bar, then click on the Duty button and set the value of duty cycle for the square wave as shown below:

Figure 8 The GIF shows the setting of properties for producing square wave from SQ1 pin

Now, once the square wave has been set click on the view button, the oscilloscope will open then select the CH1 pin and you can see the square wave on the monitor as shown by the screen in Figure 9.

Figure 9 shows the screenshot of the square wave as shown in the oscilloscope

Thus we have produced different waveforms using PSLab wave generator module.

Resources

PSLab device pin diagram  – https://github.com/fossasia/pslab-artwork/blob/master/Sticker/pslabdesign.png

Youtube Video Screencast for Wave Generator – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NC2T5kElWbE&t=1s

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Making Zoom View in PSLab Android app

This blog demonstrates how to make a zoom view in an Android app by taking example from one made in PSLab Android app. It will mainly reflect the work done under PR #1117 in PSLab Android repository. The demonstration shown in this blog is for zooming a complete layout. But individual components of a layout can also be given this zoom effect.

How to make a zoom view?

Below is a step by step guide on how to implement a zoom view in an Android app :

  • First make a  Zoom Layout class in Android Project which will further include GestureDetector, MotionEvent, etc.
  • Now extend the Zoom Layout class from a base layout provided by Android i.e. Relative Layout, Linear Layout, etc. as per need because we need to give zoom effect to a complete layout. In this demonstration, I will use the Relative Layout class as my base class.
  • Also to detect the gestures made by a user, we need to implement the ScaleGestureDetector.OnScaleGestureListener class. So, finally, the class implementation will look like this
public class ZoomLayout extends RelativeLayout implements ScaleGestureDetector.OnScaleGestureListener {
}
  • Now make default constructors and declare variables to define the range of the minimum and maximum possible zoom, coordinates before drag, coordinates after drag, etc.
private static final float MIN_ZOOM = 1.0f;
private static final float MAX_ZOOM = 4.0f;
private Mode mode = Mode.NONE;
private float scale = 1.0f;
private float lastScaleFactor = 0f;
private float startX = 0f;
private float startY = 0f;
private float dx = 0f;
private float dy = 0f;
private float prevDx = 0f;
private float prevDy = 0f;

public ZoomLayout(Context context) {
   super(context);
   init(context);
}

Here startX and startY are the initial coordinates of the layout, dx and dy are the new coordinates of the layout and prevDx and prevDy are the coordinates of the previous location of the layout. Also, mode is the current mode of the gesture which will be further elaborated upon in coming steps, and all other remaining variables are for scaling the screen on gesture movements. Also, init(context) is a method which will be explained in step 5.

  • Now, we will make a method named init() to initiate the process of scaling the layout on gesture detection.
public void init(Context context) {
        final ScaleGestureDetector scaleDetector = new ScaleGestureDetector(context, this);
        this.setOnTouchListener(new OnTouchListener() {
            @Override
            public boolean onTouch(View view, MotionEvent motionEvent) {
                switch (motionEvent.getAction() & MotionEvent.ACTION_MASK) {
                    case MotionEvent.ACTION_DOWN:
                        if (scale > MIN_ZOOM) {
                            mode = Mode.DRAG;
                            startX = motionEvent.getX() - prevDx;
                            startY = motionEvent.getY() - prevDy;
                        }
                        break;
                    case MotionEvent.ACTION_MOVE:
                        if (mode == Mode.DRAG) {
                            dx = motionEvent.getX() - startX;
                            dy = motionEvent.getY() - startY;
                        }
                        break;
                    case MotionEvent.ACTION_POINTER_DOWN:
                        mode = Mode.ZOOM;
                        break;
                    case MotionEvent.ACTION_POINTER_UP:
                        mode = Mode.DRAG;
                        break;
                    case MotionEvent.ACTION_UP:
                        mode = Mode.NONE;
                        prevDx = dx;
                        prevDy = dy;
                        break;
                    default:
                        mode = Mode.NONE;
                        prevDx = dx;
                        prevDy = dy;
                        break;
                }
                scaleDetector.onTouchEvent(motionEvent);

                if ((mode == Mode.DRAG && scale >= MIN_ZOOM) || mode == Mode.ZOOM) {
                    getParent().requestDisallowInterceptTouchEvent(true);
                    float maxDx = (child().getWidth() - (child().getWidth() / scale)) / 2 * scale;
                    float maxDy = (child().getHeight() - (child().getHeight() / scale)) * scale;
                    dx = Math.min(Math.max(dx, -maxDx), maxDx);
                    dy = Math.min(Math.max(dy, -maxDy), maxDy);
                    applyScaleAndTranslation();
                }
                return true;
            }
        });
    }

The detailed explanation of the above code snippet is as follows:

  1. scaleDetector – A gesture detector variable to store the scaling of the screen i.e. how much the screen is zoomed
  2. onTouch() – It is the main method handling the calculations for zooming the layout and setting the position of the zoomed layout. The view attribute is the current view of the layout and the motionEvent attribute handles the different task for different gestures made by a user.

Here the mode variable is used to define one of the three gestures i.e. NONE, DRAG or ZOOM where

  1. NONE – No gesture detected on the screen
  2. DRAG – Sliding gestures are made
  3. ZOOM – Pinch gesture is made

Also, a detailed explanation of the motion events used in the switch case can be found out in the resources [1].

After the switch case, the if statement is used to do calculations based on the current child in focus and the previous coordinates if and only if the zoom hasn’t reached the maximum limit and the view is dragged to see the zoomed contents. Method getParent().requestDisallowInterceptTouchEvent(true) is used to disable the scroll effect of the parent layout if any. In this case, the zoomed layout is inside a bottom sheet and so by using this method, the bottom sheet isn’t closed on swipe down gesture.

  • Now create applyScaleAndTransition() method and child() method used in step 5.
private View child() {
        return getChildAt(0);
    }

This method is used to return the current child layout in focus i.e. visible on the screen.

private void applyScaleAndTranslation() {
        child().setScaleX(scale);
        child().setScaleY(scale);
        child().setTranslationX(dx);
        child().setTranslationY(dy);
    }

This method is used to apply the final calculations that are done in step 5 to the child layout in focus.

So, now the Zoom Layout is ready for use and can be used as same as we use the Relative Layout in the XML files. The final output produced by using the Zoom Layout as a child of bottom sheet in PSLab Android app is as shown in figure 1.

Figure 1. Demonstration of Zoom Layout made in PSLab Android app

Resources

  1. https://developer.android.com/reference/android/view/MotionEvent – Documentation of motion event gestures in android

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