Implementing search bar in PSLab app

PSLab offers a large range of functions with a large field of applications. This results in the long access path to certain information and functionality in the app, which affects the user experience (UX) negatively. In this blog post, I will show how the UX in Android applications with many functions can be improved by implementing a ‘Search Bar’. Further, I have created a screencast that follows the step-by-step description shown in this blog post [1].

Search Bar is the functionality which can be seen nowadays in almost all the apps. It is a handy widget for users to navigate the app. PSLab’s Android app was lacking this functionality and so I added it using an external library from Mirrajabi called ‘search-dialog’ [3]. I decided to use this library as it provides a search bar with built-in functionality of highlighting the text that’s selected or written down in the ‘Edit Text’ field by the user and also it overlays on the screen which provides a good user experience rather than other search bars which overlap on the text provided on the screen with a ListView. Further working with this dependency was easier than working with others as it seems well designed.

The Search Bar was added in the Saved Experiments section which contains a lot of default experiments along with their respective manuals. The search bar was intended to provide the user with a greater UI so that they don’t need to navigate through sections every time to find an experiment.

This blog is a step by step guide on how to implement it in any app.

  1. First, add dependencies in the gradle at both project level and app level. By adding these dependencies, we don’t need to worry about writing code for how the Search Bar will filter searches and how it will be placed on the screen.

App Level :

'com.github.mirrajabi:search-dialog:1.1'

Project Level :

maven { url "https://jitpack.io" }
  1.  Create a SearchModel class which will help to carry out the search operations.
public class SearchModel implements Searchable {

	private String mTitle;

	public SearchModel(String mTitle) {
    	this.mTitle = mTitle;
	}

	public void setTitle(String mTitle) {
    	this.mTitle = mTitle;
	}

	@Override
	public String getTitle() {
    	return mTitle;
	}
}

The SearchModel class helps to communicate with the filtered search results by returning the string which is selected:

  • SearchModel(String string) – It is a default constructor
  • setTitle(String string) – It is a method used to set the string provided in the search results
  • getTitle() – It is also a method to get the string selected by the user from the filtered search result provided
  1.  Now provide some data which needs to be searched using an ArrayList or by using StringArrays and then converting it to Search Model Object.
private ArrayList<SampleSearchModel> createSampleData(){
        ArrayList<SampleSearchModel> items = new ArrayList<>();
        items.add(new SampleSearchModel("First item"));
        items.add(new SampleSearchModel("Second item"));
        items.add(new SampleSearchModel("Third item"));
        items.add(new SampleSearchModel("Fourth item"));

        return items;
    }
  1.  At last add the constructor in MainActivity to make the search bar.
SimpleSearchDialogCompat(Context context, String title, String searchHint, @Nullable Filter filter, ArrayList<T> items,
SearchResultListener<T> searchResultListener)

All the parameters can be given according to requirement. The function of each and every parameter are as under :

  • Context – Provide context of the current activity
  • String title – To provide title to Search Bar
  • String searchHint – To provide hint text to the user
  • Filter – To provide any additional filters to the search made by the user
  • ArrayList<T> – To provide data that can be searched
  • SearchResultListener<T> – The method which handles what to do when a user clicks on the filtered searches provided

Let’s try to search for the Piezo Buzzer and UltraSonic Range Finder Experiments in the Search Bar :

Figure 1. GIF of implemented Search Bar

So, in this way, I have implemented the Search Bar functionality in the PSLab application. One last note that try to practice this widget before implementing it in the main project as it requires some practice of filters as per requirements and also its location needs to be defined as per the requirement of an organization as it can be placed anywhere from the main screen to the toolbar to navigation drawer. Below are some of the useful resources to get best practice.

Resources

  1. https://youtu.be/QyqbRHt1NUE – How to make a search bar like above (By – Harsh Patel (me))
  2. https://github.com/mirrajabi/search-dialog – This is the GitHub Page of the library which I used in making an attractive screen overlaying search bar rather than the old one with the list view placed in the toolbar

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Creating the onScreen Monitor Using CardView

The PSLab works as a Wave generator and the Oscilloscope when connected with the Android device. The mockup of the Wave Generator has been created in the blog Creating the Mockup for Wave Generator using Moqups.

In this blog, we will create the monitor screen in the PSLab Android app using Android studio.

Deciding the layout to use for monitors

As monitors with rounded border look appealing on android device screen so we will select CardView to be the base layout of our monitors. The CardView element allows us to add certain properties like rounded corners, elevation etc.

To use the CardView in your app, add the following dependency to build.gradle file and sync the project.

dependencies {    // CardView    
implementation 'com.android.support:cardview-v7:27.1.1'
}

Add the <android.support.v7.widget.CardView> widget to your layout and all the other views to be shown on monitor screen will be placed inside this card layout as its child layout.

Creating the monitor cards

We need to decide how much spacing is to be provided to the cards to properly view them on different screens. Here we make use of the special attribute in the View class.

android:layout_weight=1

This attribute assigns an “importance” value to a View in terms of how much space it should occupy on the screen. That is if we give equal weight to two views which inside the same parent then they will both occupy equal space.

To implement this create two CardViews inside <LinearLayout> with the same layout_weight.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<LinearLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    xmlns:card_view="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res-auto"
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="wrap_content">

    <android.support.v7.widget.CardView
        android:layout_width="0dp"
        android:layout_height="250dp"
        android:layout_weight="1"
        card_view:cardCornerRadius="10dp" />

    <android.support.v7.widget.CardView
        android:layout_width="0dp"
        android:layout_height="250dp"
        android:layout_weight="1"
        card_view:cardCornerRadius="10dp" />

</LinearLayout>

So this will give us a screen like this with equally weighted monitor card views as shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1 shows two CardView with equal weights(w/2) and equal width

Both the cards have the width equal to half the screen width which is set automatically by the Android.

Creating partitions in the monitors

We have to make partitions in the monitor screen so that every characteristic of Wave Generator like wave frequency, phase, selected pin etc. can be viewed simultaneously on the screen with proper spacing.

For making partitions we need to make a separator line which we can create by using <View> and setting the attributes as below:

<View
        android:layout_width="@dimen/length_0dp"
        android:layout_height="@dimen/divider_width"
        android:background="@color/dark_grey" />

This will create a thin line having the grey color. We have to make four partitions of the card view for both monitors as shown in Figure 2.

Figure 2 shows two monitors with line separator making partitions

Populating the screen with text and image icons

We have to include the <TextView> and <ImageView> to show the property data on the monitors.

Figure 3 shows partitions in the monitor CardView

Different partitions as shown in Figure 3 can be used for showing different data such as:

  1. Top Partition:- To view the selected wave. 
  2. Left Partition:- To view the selected waveform eg:- sine, triangular 
  3. Right Partition:- To view the selected wave characteristics like frequency, phase etc. 
  4. Bottom Partition:-  To view the property selected which has been selected by user

After inserting all the desired Views and providing the Views with dummy data and icons and customizing the Views by giving proper color and spacing finally we will have a layout as shown in Figure 4.

Figure 4 shows ImageView and TextView showing different dummy data

In Figure 4, the left CardView shows all the properties for the Analog Wave Generator and the right CardView shows all the properties for Digital Wave Generator.

All the characteristics on the monitors can be controlled by the controlling panel which is work in progress.

Resources:

  1. https://developer.android.com/guide/topics/ui/layout/cardview– Article on How to Create a card based layout by Android Developer Documentation 
  2. https://stackoverflow.com/questions/5049852/android-drawing-separator-divider-line-in-layout – Stack Overflow post to create separator line

 

 

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Creating the Mockup for Wave Generator using Moqups

PSLab is a versatile device that can be used as a waveform signal generator, as it is capable of producing different types of waves. It provides a cheap and portable alternative as compared to the physical wave generators available in markets.

The current UI of the Wave Generator present in the PSLab app as shown in Figure 1 is very basic and makes use of some basic UI components which are not able to properly expose all the functionalities of the wave generator. This affects the user experience negatively.

Figure 1 shows the current layout of Wave Generator in PSLab android app

In this blog, we will discuss creating a mockup for the PSLab wave generator using modern design to improve the UI/UX of the app. I will try to keep the layout simple enough so that users can easily understand it. 

Understanding the Functionality of Waveform Generator

Figure 2 shows the schematic pin diagram of the PSLab

We can observe from the image that PSLab provide:

  • Two pins named W1 and W2 which are capable of producing two different sine or saw-tooth waves having different characteristics simultaneously.
  • Four Pins named SQ1, SQ2, SQ3, SQ4 which are capable of producing Square Wave and Pulse Width modulation signals.
  • It also allows us to change the properties of these waves such as frequency, phase, duty cycle.

Before starting with the mockup a physical commodity Waveform Signal Generator as shown in Figure 3 was inspected.

Figure 3 shows digital Wave Generator by HP

Most waveform generators in the market have a control panel with buttons and a monitor screen so that the user can view the changes while controlling the characteristics of the wave. I will try to create a layout similar to this in following steps by dividing it into two halves:

  1. Upper half containing monitor screens
  2. Lower half containing controlling panel having buttons

Steps for creating the mockup

Step 1: Choosing the Tool

The tool that we will be using here to create a mockup is moqups[1].

I have chosen this software because:-

  • It is an online tool and doesn’t require it to be set up first
  • It is very efficient and powerful tool for creating mobile or web wireframes.
  • It doesn’t require any prior knowledge of programming language.
  • It has a palette to drag & drop UI elements like Buttons, Textboxes, Checkboxes etc. on the left-hand side, allows modifying the features of each element (here on the right) and other options at the top related to prototyping, previewing etc as shown in figure 4.
Figure 4  shows Moqups prototyping tool webpage

Step 2: Creating the base of the layout

The mockup tool moqups[1] have a built-in template of Android screen which we can drag and drop from the palette and use it as our base.

Figure 5 shows the Android mobile template picked from the palette of available design elements in the ‘moqups’ application.

Step 3: Creating the Lower Half

Now as discussed above I will create controlling panel containing buttons in the lower half of the screen, for this I will drag and drop buttons from the palette on the right-hand side and design them according to the theme of the app that is making their border round shape, changing their color to match the theme color and editing text in them. As the PSLab has two groups of pins so I will create two different panels with buttons for properties related to the pins of that group.

At this point we have a layout looking like this:

Figure 6 shows the lower panel containing buttons being drawn for Wave Generator UI. At right-hand side, it shows the palette having different UI elements.

I will create the monitor screens in the upper half, for our purpose as I have two panels we will create two monitor screen as shown in Figure 6. The left panel will correspond to the left panel and the right monitor will correspond to the right panel.

Step 4: Creating the Upper Half

For creating monitor, I will use simple rectangles with rounded borders and give the background black to resemble the monitor in physical devices.

I will also create some partitions in the monitor to make compartment. I will use these compartments to position the text view that represents the characteristics of the wave so that they are clearly visible.

Figure 7 shows two monitor layout with the black background being drawn using text areas and lines

So, in this layout the user will be able to see all the properties corresponding to one type of waveform on the monitor together so he/she doesn’t have to click the buttons, again and again, to see the different properties as he/she have to do in a physical device.

For instance let’s say, if the user wants to generate sine wave he/she will have to click the Wave 1 button in the panel below and on clicking,all the values of characteristics related to waveform produced by W1 pin will be visible together to the user in one screen which makes it easier for the user to analyze and set the values.

Therefore, the final layout produced is shown in Figure 7

Figure 8 shows final Wave Generator Mockup.

As we can see this layout is quite interactive and looks very appealing to the user and this will help to improve UI/UX of the app.

Resources

  1. Moqups prototyping tool website: https://moqups.com
  2. Youtube Video – How to use moqups

Continue Reading Creating the Mockup for Wave Generator using Moqups

Building PSLab Android app with Fdroid

Fdroid is a place for open source enthusiasts and developers to host their Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) for free and get more people onboard into their community. Hosting an app in Fdroid is not a fairly easy process just like hosting one in Google Play. We need to perform a set of build checks prior to making a merge request (which is similar to pull request in GitHub) in the fdroid-data GitLab repository. PSLab Android app by FOSSASIA has undergone through all these checks and tests and now ready to be published.

Setting up the fdroid-server and fdroid-data repositories is one thing. Building our app using the tools provided by fdroid is another thing. It will involve quite a few steps to get started. Fdroid requires all the apps need to be built using:

$ fdroid build -v -l org.fossasia.pslab

 

This will output a set of logs which tell us what went wrong in the builds. The usual one in a first time app is obviously the build is not taking place at all. The reason is our metadata file needs to be changed to initiate a build.

Build:<versioncode>,<versionname>
    commit=<commit which has the build mentioned in versioncode>
    subdir=app
    gradle=yes

 

When a metadata file is initially created, this build is disabled by default and commit is set to “?”. We need to fill in those blanks. Once completed, it will look like the snippet above. There can be many blocks of “Build” can be added to the end of metadata file as we are advancing and upgrading through the app. As an example, the latest PSLab Android app has the following metadata “Build” block:

Build:1.1.5,7
    commit=0a50834ccf9264615d275a26feaf555db42eb4eb
    subdir=app
    gradle=yes

 

In case of an update, add another “Build” block and mention the version you want to appear on the Fdroid repository as follows:

Auto Update Mode:Version v%v
Update Check Mode:Tags
Current Version:1.1.5
Current Version Code:7

 

Once it is all filled, run the build command once again. If you have properly set the environment in your local PC, build will end successfully assuming there were no Java or any other language syntax errors.

It is worth to mention few other facts which are common to Android software projects. Usually the source code is packed in a folder named “app” inside the repository and this is the common scenario if Android Studio builds up the project from scratch. If this “app” folder is one level below the root, that is “android/app”, the build instructions shown above will throw an error as it cannot find the project files.

The reason behind this is we have mentioned “subdir=app” in the metadata file. Change this to “subdir=android/app” and run the build again. The idea is to direct the build to find where the project files are.

Apart from that, the commit can be represented by a tag instead of a long commit hash. As an example, if we had merge commits in PSLab labeled as “v.<versioncode>”, we can simply use “commit=v.1.1.5” instead of the hash code. It is just a matter of readability.

Happy Coding!

Reference:

  1. Metadata : https://f-droid.org/docs/Build_Metadata_Reference/#Build
  2. PSLab Android app Fdroid : https://gitlab.com/fdroid/fdroiddata/merge_requests/3271/diffs

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Creating Device Screen to show connection status of PSLab Device

For using the PSLab Device the user needs to connect the PSLab device to an Android Phone having a PSLab android app. So there should be a screen that should be able to show the proper status of the PSLab device connection to the android app dynamically and it should also contain instructions on “How to connect the device to the app”.

So, in this blog we will create a device screen which shows the proper status of the connection of the PSLab device with the phone.

First step will be designing the layout for the device screen, for this we will create a fragment named HomeFragment and for its layout we will make use of the Relative Layout as view group and then create a Linearlayout inside it and position it at the center so that it always appears at the center in different screen sizes.

Then inside the LinearLayout, we will create(as shown in respective order) :

  1. ImageView and TextView for showing the status of device connection.
  2. Linear Layout with multiple TextView showing instructions on “How to connect the device to the screen”.
  3. A TextView that will direct the user to a webview showing PSLab website.

After creating all the above views we have created the layout will look like this: –

Now for showing the PSLab connection status dynamically, we have to implement following logic:

  1. When the device is connected it should show the connected icon and text and hide the instructions.
  2. When the device is disconnected it should show the disconnected icon and text and also the instructions.

For this, we will create a method inside the HomeFragment Java file which make use of Arguments deviceConnected and deviceFound to store device connected status.

public static HomeFragment newInstance(boolean deviceConnected, boolean deviceFound) {
HomeFragment homeFragment = new HomeFragment();
homeFragment.deviceConnected = deviceConnected;
homeFragment.deviceFound = deviceFound;
return homeFragment;
}

When both arguments are true we will show the connected text and icon and hide the instructions.

And when both arguments are false we will show the disconnected text and icon and display the instructions.

if (deviceFound && deviceConnected) {
   tvConnectMsg.setVisibility(View.GONE);
   tvVersion.setText(scienceLab.getVersion());
   tvVersion.setVisibility(View.VISIBLE);
   imgViewDeviceStatus.setImageResource(R.drawable.icons8_usb_connected_100);
   tvDeviceStatus.setText(getString(R.string.device_connected_successfully));
} else {
 imgViewDeviceStatus.setImageResource(R.drawable.icons_usb_disconnected_100);
 tvDeviceStatus.setText(getString(R.string.device_not_found));
}

How do we know that the device is connected?

For this, we have to handle the USB Attach event [1] that is whenever the USB is connected the Android will give a broadcast of USB connected and on receiving that broadcast in the app we will replace the HomeFragment giving setting both arguments to true. 

We will create a Broadcast Receiver[2] in the main activity which executes it’s onReceive() method on receiving USB attach event.

private final BroadcastReceiver mUsbReceiver = new BroadcastReceiver() {
   public void onReceive(Context context, Intent intent) {
     String action = intent.getAction();
     if (UsbManager.ACTION_USB_DEVICE_ATTACHED.equals(action)) {
       UsbDevice device =  intent.getParcelableExtra(UsbManager.EXTRA_DEVICE);
       if(device!=null){                                                  
         getSupportFragmentManager().beginTransaction().replace(R.id.frame,                                            
           HomeFragment.newInstance(true, true)).commitAllowingStateLoss();
         }           
      }
   }
};

Here In the OnReceive Method, we will replace our device screen fragment by passing parameters deviceConnected = true and deviceFound = true to HomeFragment newInstance() method.

Every time we create a Receiver we have to bind corresponding intent filters with broadcast receivers when the application is created.

IntentFilter filter = new IntentFilter(UsbManager.ACTION_USB_DEVICE_ATTACHED);
registerReceiver(mUsbReceiver, filter);

Similarly, we also have to handle the USB Detach event [2], here we will create a Broadcast Receiver[2] which executes in onReceive() method whenever the device is detached and here inside onReceive() method we will replace our device screen by passing parameters deviceConnected = false and deviceFound = false to newInstance() method in HomeFragment.

private final BroadcastReceiver mUsbReceiver = new BroadcastReceiver() {
   public void onReceive(Context context, Intent intent) {
     String action = intent.getAction();
     if (UsbManager.ACTION_USB_DEVICE_DETACHED.equals(action)) {                                           
getSupportFragmentManager().beginTransaction().replace(R.id.frame,                                            
           HomeFragment.newInstance(false, false)).commitAllowingStateLoss();
         }           
      }
   }
};

Thus, as shown in fig. 2 we have shown the PSLab device connection status dynamically on the screen by handling the USB attach/detach events.

Figure 2 shows the UI of ‘Device Screen’ for the two possible status: ‘not connected’ and ‘connected’

Resources

  1. Codepool Blog – “How to monitor USB events on Android?” by Xiao Ling
  2. Vogella article “What is Broadcast Receiver and how to insert it your app?”

Continue Reading Creating Device Screen to show connection status of PSLab Device

Publish an Open Source app on Fdroid

Fdroid is a famous software repository hosted with numerous free and open source Android apps. They have a main repository where they allow developers hosting free and ad free software after a thorough check up on the app. This blog will tell you how to get your project hosted in their repository using steps I followed to publish the PSLab Android app.

Before you get started, make sure you have the consent from your developer community to publish their app on Fdroid. Fdroid requires your app to use all kind of open resources to implement features. If there is any closed source libraries in your app and you still want to publish it on Fdroid, you may have to reimplement that feature by any other mean without using closed source resources. They will also not allow to have Google’s proprietary “play-services” in your app along with proprietary ad services. You can find the complete inclusion policy document from their official page.

When your app is fully ready, you can get started with the inclusion procedure. Unlike how we are publishing apps on Google Play, publishing an app on Fdroid is as simple as sending a pull request to their main repository. That’s exactly what we have to do. In simple terms all we have to do is:

  1. Fork the Fdroid main data repository
  2. Make changes to their files to include our app
  3. Do a pull request

First of all you need a GitLab account as the Fdroid repository is hosted in GitLab. Once you are ready with a GitLab account, fork and clone the f-droid-data repository. The next step is to install the fdroid-server. This can be simply done using apt:

$ sudo apt install fdroidserver

 
Once that is done, go into the directory where you cloned the repository and run the following command to check if the initiation is complete.

$ fdroid init

 
Then run the following command to read current meta data where it saves all the information related to existing apps on Fdroid;

$ fdroid readmeta

 
This will list out various details about the current meta files. Next step is to add our app details into this meta file. This can be done easily using following command or you can manually create folders and files. But the following is safer;

$ fdroid import --url https://github.com/fossasia/pslab-android --subdir app

 
Replace the link to repository from the –url tag in the above command. For instance the following will be the link for fossasia-phimpme android;

$ fdroid import --url https://github.com/fossasia/phimpme-android --subdir app

 
This will create a file named as “org.fossasia.pslab” in the metadata directory. Open up this text file and we have to fill in our details.

  1. Categories
  2. License
  3. Web Site
  4. Summary
  5. Description

Description needs to be terminated with a newline and a dot to avoid build failures.

Once the file is filled up, run the following command to make sure that the metadata file is complete.

$ fdroid readmeta

 
Then run the following command to clean up the file

$ fdroid rewritemeta org.fossasia.pslab

 
We can automatically add version details using the following command:

$ fdroid checkupdates org.fossasia.pslab

 
Now run the lint test to see if the app is building correctly.

$ fdroid lint org.fossasia.pslab

 
If there are any errors thrown, fix them to get to the next step where we actually build the app:

$ fdroid build -v -l org.fossasia.pslab

 
Now you are ready to make the pull request which will then get reviewed by developers in Fdroid community to get it merged into their main branch. Make a commit and then push to your fork. From there it is pretty straightforward to make a pull request to the main repository. Once that is done, they will test the app for any insecurities. If all of them are passed, the app will be available in Fdroid!

Reference:

  1. Quick Start: https://gitlab.com/fdroid/fdroiddata/blob/master/README.md#quickstart
  2. Making merge requests: https://gitlab.com/fdroid/fdroiddata/blob/master/CONTRIBUTING.md#merge-requests

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Implementing Clickable Images

PSLab Android application is a feature rich compact app to user interface the PSLab hardware device. Similarly the PSLab device itself is a compact device with a plenty of features to replace almost all the analytical instruments in a school science lab. When a first time user takes the device and connect it with the Android app, there are so many pins labeled with abbreviations. This creates lots of complications unless the user checks the pinout diagram separately.

As a workaround a UI is proposed to integrate a layout containing the PSLab PCB image where user can click on each pin to get a dialog box explaining him what that specific pin is and what it does. This implementation can be done it two ways;

  • Using an Image map
  • Using (x,y) coordinates

The first implementation is more practical and can be applied with any device with any dimension. The latter requires some transformation to capture the correct position when user has clicked on a pin. So the first method will be implemented.

The idea behind using an image map is to have two images with exact dimensions on top of each other. The topmost image will be the color map which we create ourselves using unique colors at unique heat points. This image will have the visibility setting invisible as the main idea is to let the  user see a meaningful image and capture the positions using a secondary in the back end.

To make things much clear, let’s have a look at a color map image I am suggesting here for a general case.

If we overlap the color map with the PSLab layout, we will be able to detect where user has clicked using Android onTouchEvent.

@Override
public boolean onTouchEvent(MotionEvent ev) {
   final int action = ev.getAction();
   final int evX = (int) ev.getX();
   final int evY = (int) ev.getY();
   switch (action) {
       case MotionEvent.ACTION_UP :
         int touchColor = getHotspotColor (R.id.backgroundMap, evX, evY);
         /* Display the relevant pin description dialog box here */
         break;
   }
   return true;
}

 
Color of the clicked position can be captured using the following code;

public int getHotspotColor (int hotspotId, int x, int y) {
   ImageView img = (ImageView) findViewById (hotspotId);
   img.setDrawingCacheEnabled(true);
   Bitmap hotspots = Bitmap.createBitmap(img.getDrawingCache());
   img.setDrawingCacheEnabled(false);
   return hotspots.getPixel(x, y);
}

 
If we go into details, from the onTouchEvent we capture the (x,y) coordinates related to user click. Then this location is looked up for a unique color by creating a temporary bitmap and then getting the pixel value at the captured coordinate.

There is an error in this method as the height parameter always have an offset. This offset is introduced by the status bar and the action bar of the application. If we use this method directly, there will be an exception thrown out saying image height is less than the height defined by y.

Solving this issue involves calculating status bar and actionbar heights separately and then subtract them from the y coordinate.

Actionbar and status bar heights can be calculated as follows;

Rect rectangle = new Rect();
Window window = getWindow();
window.getDecorView().getWindowVisibleDisplayFrame(rectangle);
int statusBarHeight = rectangle.top;
int contentViewTop = window.findViewById(Window.ID_ANDROID_CONTENT).getTop();
int titleBarHeight= contentViewTop - statusBarHeight;

 
Using them, we can modify the captured coordinates as follows;

int touchColor = getHotspotColor (R.id.imageArea, evX, evY - statusBarHeight);

 
This way the exception is handled by adjusting the cursor position. Once this is done, it is all about displaying the correct pin description dialog box.

Reference:

Calculate status bar height: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/3407256/height-of-status-bar-in-android

Continue Reading Implementing Clickable Images

Making Shapes with PSLab Oscilloscope

Looking back to history, the first ever video game was ‘Pong’ which was played on an analog oscilloscope with a very small screen. Oscilloscopes are not made to play video games, but by just tinkering around its basic functionality which is display waveforms, we can do plenty of cool things. PSLab device also has an oscilloscope; in fact it’s a four channel oscilloscope.

This blog post will show you how the oscilloscope in PSLab is not just a cheap oscilloscope but it has lots of functionalities an industry grade oscilloscope has (except for the bandwidth limitation to a maximum of 2 MHz)

To produce shapes like above figures, we are using another instrument available in PSLab. That is ‘Waveform Generator’. PSLab Waveform Generator can generate three different waveforms namely Sine waves, Triangular waves and Square waves ranging from 5 Hz to 5 kHz.

To get started, first connect two jumper wires between SI1-CH1 and SI2-CH2 pins. We needn’t worry about ground pins as they are already internally connected. Now it’s time to open up the PSLab oscilloscope. Here we are going to utilize two channels for this activity and they will be CH1 and CH2. Check the tick boxes in front of ‘Chan 1’ and ‘Chan 2’ and set ‘Range’ to “+/-4V” to have the maximum visibility filling the whole screen with the waveform.

The shapes are drawn using a special mode called ‘X-Y Mode’ in PSLab oscilloscope. In this mode, two channels will be plotted against their amplitudes at every point in time.

As it is already mentioned that PSLab can generate many waveform types and also they can have different phase angles relative to each other. They can have different independent frequencies. With all these combinations, we can tweak the settings in Waveform Generator to produce different cool shapes in PSLab oscilloscope.

These shapes can vary from basic geometric shapes such as circle, square, rectangle to complicated shapes such as rhombus, ellipse and polynomial curves.

Circle

A circular shape can be made by generating two sine waves having the same frequency but with a phase difference of 90 degrees or 270 degrees between the two wave forms.

 

 
 

 


Square

Square shape can be made by generating two triangular waveforms again having the same frequency but with a phase difference of either 90 degrees or 270 degrees between the two.

 

 

 
 


Rectangle

Similar to creating a Square, by having the same frequency for both triangular waveforms but a different phase angle greater than or less than 90 degree will do the trick.

 

 

 
 


Rhombus

Keeping the waveform settings same for the rectangle, by changing the amplitude of the SI1 waveform using the knob we can generate a rhombic shape on the XY graph plot.

 

 

 
 


Ellipse

Generating ellipse is also similar to creating a rhombus. But here we are using sine waves instead of triangular waves. By changing the amplitude of SI1 using the knob we can change the curvature.

 

 

 


Helix

Helix or spiral shape can be generated using two sine waves having same phase but two different frequencies. Frequencies better be integer multiples of the smaller frequency to  have a steady shape.

 

 

 


Parabola

Parabolic shapes can be generated by mixing up triangular waves with sine waves with different phase angles.

 

 

 

 
 

More random shapes


References:

https://www.aps.org/publications/apsnews/200810/physicshistory.cfm

Continue Reading Making Shapes with PSLab Oscilloscope

Creating Custom Borders for Widgets and Layouts in PSLab Android

User Interface (UI) is one of the most important part of any software development. In PSLab Android App while developing the UI, custom borders are used for various widgets and layouts. This makes the UI look more appealing and widgets and layouts look more highlighted.

In Android, we can do a range of border customization. We can make border rounded, define its thickness and even change its color. Let’s see how to achieve this.

First, go to drawable folder in the tree view on the left size of the Android studio. Then go to new and click on Drawable resource file.

Then a New Resource File dialog box will appear. Type the filename and then click OK.

After this, a new XML file is created. Now we can write the code for creating custom borders. For this, we have to define few elements.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<shape xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android">
....
</shape>

Shape Drawables allows defining background, borders, and gradients for the Views.

<solid android:color="#FFFFFF"/>

Here we are setting the background color of the widget/layout to which the border is applied to.

<stroke android:width="3dip" android:color="#B1BCBE" />

Now we are applying the 3dip width to the border and set its color. This shape requires the <stroke> element to define the width and color of the line.

<corners android:radius="10dip"/>

In order to make the corners of the border round, <corner> element is used to define the radius of the corners. We are taking it to be 10dip.

<padding android:left="0dip" android:top="0dip" android:right="0dip" android:bottom="0dip" />

The padding is expressed in pixels for the left, top, right and bottom parts of the view. Padding is used to offset the content of the view by a specific number of pixels.

After applying this border on a layout we get the following results.

Similarly making following changes in the element values help us to make border for the Text View

<solid android:color="@android:color/white" />
<stroke android:width="1dip" android:color="#ffcdd2" />
<corners android:radius="2dp"/>

Other examples

Control Activity

Logical Analyzer Activity

Resources

  1. Stack Overflow Solution to How to make a layout with rounded corners?
  2. Youtube Video on How to create a layout with rounded corner borders in Android? by Sylvain Saurel
Continue Reading Creating Custom Borders for Widgets and Layouts in PSLab Android

Markdown Support for Experiment Docs in PSLab Android

The PSLab Android App and the PSLab Desktop App come with built-in experiments which include the experiment setups as well as the experiment docs. The experiment docs for PSLab have been written in the Markdown format. So, the markdown support had to be enabled in the PSLab Android App.

There are numerous markdown file renderers for android. The most popular among them is MarkdownView (https://github.com/falnatsheh/MarkdownView) which is an  open-source service.

This blog covers how to enable the support for markdown in apps and use to generate elegant documentation.

Enabling MarkdownView

MarkdownView can be enabled by simply adding a dependency in the build.gradle file

compile 'us.feras.mdv:markdownview:1.1.0'

 

Creating the layout file

The layout file for supporting a markdown file is fairly simple. The inclusion of the above dependency simplifies the things. The view holder for markdown is created and an id is assigned to it.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<LinearLayout
   xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
   xmlns:app="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res-auto"
   android:orientation="vertical"
   android:layout_width="match_parent"
   android:layout_height="match_parent">

   <br.tiagohm.markdownview.MarkdownView
       android:layout_width="match_parent"
       app:escapeHtml="false"
       android:layout_height="match_parent"
       android:id="@+id/perform_experiment_md" />
</LinearLayout>

 

Loading the markdown file

In order to load the markdown file, a MarkdownView object is created. Since, in the PSLab Android app, markdown files which form the documentation part are a part of the experiments. So, the files are displayed in the documentation fragment of the experiments.

private String mdFile;
private MarkdownView mMarkdownView;

public static ExperimentDocFragment newInstance(String mdFile) {
   ExperimentDocFragment experimentDocFragment = new ExperimentDocFragment();
   experimentDocFragment.mdFile = mdFile;
   return experimentDocFragment;
}

 

The MarkdownView object created is assigned to markdown viewholder of the relevant layout file. Here, the layout file was named experiment_doc_md and the view holder was assigned the id perform_experiment_md. The markdown files were stored in the assets directory of the app and the files were loaded from the there.

public View onCreateView(LayoutInflater inflater, @Nullable ViewGroup container, @Nullable Bundle savedInstanceState) {
   View view = inflater.inflate(R.layout.experiment_doc_md, container, false);
   mMarkdownView = (MarkdownView) view.findViewById(R.id.perform_experiment_md);
   mMarkdownView.loadMarkdownFromAsset("capacitance.md");
   return view;
}

 

The available methods in markdown view are

  • loadMarkdown – loads directly from the content in the string 

mMarkdownView.loadMarkdown("**MarkdownView**");

 

  • loadMarkdownFromAsset – loads markdown files located in the assets directory of the app

mMarkdownView.loadMarkdownFromAsset("markdown1.md");

 

  • loadMarkdownFromFile – loads markdown from a file stored in the app not present in the assets directory

mMarkdownView.loadMarkdownFromFile(new File());

 

  • loadMarkdownFromUrl – loads markdown from the specified URL (requires internet connection, as file is loaded from the web)

mMarkdownView.loadMarkdownFromUrl("url");

 

Important points for consideration

  • Avoid using elements of GitHub Flavoured Markdown (GFM) as it is not fully supported. It is better to stick to the traditional markdown style.
  • While adding images in the markdown files, avoid using specific dimensions as the images may not load properly in some cases due to the wide variety of screen sizes in android devices.
  • It is better to store the Markdown files to be loaded in the assets directory of the app and load it from there instead of the other methods mentioned above.

References

  1. A comprehensive markdown tutorial to learn markdown scripting https://www.markdowntutorial.com/
  2. MarkdownView repository on Github by tiagohm https://github.com/tiagohm/MarkdownView
  3. Learn more about Github Flavoured Markdown (GFM) https://guides.github.com/features/mastering-markdown/
Continue Reading Markdown Support for Experiment Docs in PSLab Android